Movie Shivaay
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Indian Movie “Shivaay”

AJAY’S NEVER-ENDING SAGA IS HIGH ON ACTION BUT LACKS SOUL

Story: Shivaay Ajay Devgn,
a fearless Himalayan mountaineer covered in Lord Shiva tattoos,
heads to Bulgaria to fulfill his nine-year-old daughter Gaura’s
Abigail Eames wish of seeing her mother Olga (Erika Kaar),
who abandoned them years ago.
But their plan goes for a toss when the little girl gets kidnapped in the foreign land.
Rescuing her from the masked child-traffickers becomes his only reason for survival.

Review: On heart-pounding beats of Bolo Har Har,
Shivaay has a spectacular opening scene that sees Ajay descending dangerous Himalayan cliffs like a pro.
The stunning cinematography captures the mountains like no Hindi film has managed so far. You feel you are in for an adrenaline pumping ride and expect a nerve-racking survival drama to unfold in the hills, on the lines of ‘Cliffhanger’ or ‘Vertical Limit’. However, the film takes a cliched spin and ends up looking like a slow-mo version of Liam Neeson’s ‘Taken’ franchise

Bollywood Movie

AJAY’S NEVER-ENDING SAGA IS HIGH ON ACTION BUT LACKS SOUL

Indian Movie Shivaay

Indian Movie Shivaay

Splayed shirtless on a snow-clad peak with a baby bong in his hand is Shivaay (Ajay Devgn), a mountaineering expert who splits his time between assisting the Indian Army, heading trekking tours and flirting with unsuspecting tourists.

When one such Bulgarian PYT, Olga (Erika Kaar) takes to his hillbilly ways, the two decide to make the most of her few days in India. This superlative plan however leads to a pregnancy and Shivaay zips her home from the clinic, driving maniacally. And before you assume this is a mountain method for abortion, he offers her a glass of milk, requesting she let him keep the baby. Her response is evident in the following montage where we see a blue-eyed girl Gaura (Abigail Eames) growing up in the absence of a mother. Olga apparently returned to Bulgaria to pursue her “plans”.

All is good, until Gaura learns that her mother exists. The mute girl makes much noise and Shivaay addresses the matter by flying her to Bulgaria for a family union. This is when the film picks up pace. Gaura is kidnapped by the local mafia in Sofia who deal in flesh trade and Shivaay must retrieve her. If this means latching on to roofs of cars for elongated periods of time or bashing up multiple skulls in the process, so be it.

Among the peripheral cast, we have Girish Karnad, playing a wheelchair-bound geriatric and father of Anushka (Sayyeshaa Saigal) — an Indian embassy hand uninterested in Shivaay’s situation. Noticing her daughter’s reluctance to take up the issue of missing children, the invalid struggles to get on his feet to emphasise “kisi ko toh khada hona padega”. But standing alone against eyeliner-wearing baddies, some of whom bob their heads to opera while stroking wooden masks, is the eponymous lead. Whether he succeeds in his pursuit is barely a mystery but the number of car crashes enroute could have Rohit Shetty seething with jealousy.

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